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Robert Steatham - Hannah's Origins


Here we are trying to ascertain Hannah's origins, and we have to rely on the IGI [IGI] , to research this.




Photo of Robert Steatham's baptism

Robert Steatham's baptism.
Robert Steatham's baptism

Robert Statham was baptised [SRO] by the Vicar Athanasius Herring M.A., on Sunday the 10th December 1775, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.

The baptism states "Robert the Illegitimate Child of Hannah Statham ? Bapt the 10".

To read more about St Mary the Virgin, go to
Steatham Research - Churches page.




Photo of Hannah Statham's baptism

Hannah Statham's baptism.
Hannah Statham

Hannah Statham was baptised [IGI] on Wednesday the 27th July 1757, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.

So Hannah Statham would have been 18 years of age when she gave birth to Robert Steatham.

Hannah Steatham had a brother John Statham, baptised [IGI] on Wednesday the 21st October 1761, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire, and had a sister True Heart Statham, baptised [IGI] on Sunday the 12th February 1764, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.


The parents were a William Statham and Anne Hart.






Photo of William Statham's marriage

William Statham's marriage to Anne Hart.



William Statham's marriage.

William Statham married [IGI] Anne Hart on Monday the 7th February 1757, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.


Photo of William Statham's baptism

William Statham's baptism.


William Statham's baptism.

William Statham was baptised [IGI] as William Statum on Sunday the 7th June 1733, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.

William had a brother John Statham, baptised [IGI] on wednesday the 3rd March 1717, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.

William had another brother Robert Statham, baptised [IGI] on Sunday the 27th November 1718, at St Mary the Virgin, Uttoxeter, Staffordshire.

This Robert would be Hannah's great uncle.

The IGI contains other Robert Stathams up to Hannah's birth, but their replationship to this tree has not been determined at this time.


William's parents were a William Stathum and Hannah Cope.






Photo of William Statham's marriage

William Statham's marriage.



William Statham's marriage.

William Statham married [IGI] Hannah Cope on Thursday the 25th June 1716, at Hanbury, Staffordshire.

Hanbury is about 5 miles, south east of Uttoxeter.
Photo of Plaque listing Vicars at Hanbury Church

Plaque listing Vicars at Hanbury Church.



We can see that they were married by the Revd. Timothy Corbott, according to the plaque now in the church, the [CED] says that it was a William Bladon!
Photo of Plaque - pre-dating William Statham's marriage - Hanbury Church

Plaque - pre-dating William Statham's
marriage - Hanbury Church.
This plaque in the church pre-dates William Statham's marriage of 25th June 1716, and could well have been seen by him on the day!

The name Hanbury reflects its geographical location from the Saxon word ‘hean’ meaning high. It was a very large parish geographically.

A nunnery was founded here by King Ethelred in about 680. His niece, who became the prioress, was later to become St Werburgh.

The church of St Werburgh is on an elevated position on Hanbury Hill. The earliest part of the building dates from the 13th century, and the chancel was re-built in 1862.

The tower was extended in 1883. A notable monument is the busts of two severe-looking Puritan ladies, which are unusual. They depict Mrs Agard and her daughter, Mrs Wollcocke. Sir John Egerton, who died in 1662, a Royalist and Axe Bearer of Needwood Forest, was buried by his sister in the north aisle so that he might be away from the gaze of these two formidable ladies.

The church conatins the oldest alabaster tomb in Staffordshire, that of Sir John de Hanbury, who died about 1303.

Nearby Fauld is notable for one of the worst home front disasters of the Second World War, an explosion which took place on 27 November 1944. 4000 tons of stored bombs exploded, resulting in 70 dead or missing.








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